Agile Lab - Training, Coaching and Consultancy Blog

Thursday, 12 March 2009 at

New Course - Build Interfaces that Users want to Use

Introduction to User Interface Design and Development

User interface design and development is perhaps the hardest aspect of web and software development to get right. What makes it particularly difficult is that there are no good ways of developing interface software that don't involve getting feedback from users.

The good news however is that there are a set of relatively quick and easy methods for involving users in the process of designing and developing user interfaces. These methods can dramatically improve the speed and quality of user interfaces that are developed.

The course provides course participants with the basic skills that they need to develop better user interfaces – interfaces that users will actually want to use. As well as introducing the most important concepts of UI design and development, the course gives participants direct experience and practice of using the methods discussed.

Low-tech prototyping of interfaces and wire-framing
The fastest way to develop effecting and compelling user interfaces is by starting out with paper and pencil. Wire-framing is a computer based technique that is almost as fast but gives a better feel of what a final interface might feel like.

Really, really fast user testing
User testing doesn’t have to be a long drawn-out process, it can be done very quickly and can massively improve the quality of the final interface design.

Including feedback from user testing into production code: the lifecyle of user interface design
It is very rare that the first attempt at coding an interface is the final one. But rearranging the software development process so that it can take account of the feedback about the interface from users can seem like a daunting task. However the changes do not have to be major to have major effects.

10 Do’s and don’t for user interface design
We go through the 10 most important heuristics - ″rules of thumb″ that should be applied when developing a user interface. Applying these rules can substantially improve the quality of user interfaces in a very short time.


Mark Stringer is a trainer, coach and consultant. He has worked as a software developer and project manager for IBM and Xerox and for a series of small internet start ups. He has also worked as a researcher and taught Human Computer Interaction and Interface Design at Cambridge and Sussex Universities.



Mail mark@agilelab.co.uk 07736 807 604

Labels: , , , ,

© Agile Lab, 2007-2009. All rights reserved.

sitemap

Powered by Blogger

Subscribe to Posts [Atom]